The event’s aim was to bring together health professionals from university, health related sectors and communities to discuss health challenges facing the African continent and the BAME community. Health organisations and charities were also invited to exhibit at the event.

Attendees included academics, clinical educators, practitioners, managers, students and healthcare / charity organisations involved in the delivery of services to BAME populations in the UK or Africa. I had the opportunity to exhibit both my doctoral work and our work at AFrIPEN – Grateful to Dr Emmanuel Adukwu and his colleagues for such a vibrant event and the opportunity to exhibit.

Speakers included Councilor Helen Holland, who elaborated on the global nature of Bristol, with people from over 140 countries and over 91 languages spoken. Morejoy Saineti, a dementia consultant nurse /Lecturer originally from Zimbabwe, challenged delegates and the diaspora at large to contribute in health delivery system in Africa. There was also an interesting panel discussion brilliantly led by two students from mental health and adult nursing respectively with globalization in healthcare education as one of the focus points.

I shared knowledge and our work at AFrIPEN and there was a huge interest from both academics and students. It was also fascinating to discuss barriers in IPE implementation with students who had just finished their IPE activities at UWE, particularly their interesting views on IPE in lecture rooms. I also encouraged delegates to consider attending the All Together Better Health IX conference in September. Some academics were eager to know more about our work and to see how they could contribute – l have shared their contacts with relevant board members at AfrIPEN.

The platform certainly highlighted some of our work and possibly generated new supporters of IPE and collaborative practice both at the event and on social media (Twitter/LinkedIn) afterwards!